Welding qualification tests are usually given in pre-employment screenings to ensure that the welder can weld up to the company’s standards. Welding certifications are designed to ensure the welders skills are up to the code they will be working under. Welding certifications are also documented to prove that the welder is qualified under that code. Welding codes vary a lot depending on the type of work being done. There are many organizations that have different procedures depending on the type of work they oversee.

The inspection of welds can be conducted for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most fundamental reason is to determine whether the weld is of suitable quality for its intended application. In order to evaluate a weld's quality, we must first have some form of measuring block with which to compare its characteristics. It is impractical to attempt to evaluate a weld's quality without some form of specified acceptance criteria.

The largest organization in America that certifies welders is the American Welding Society. The welding certification procedures they have approved have been tested many time to ensure that if followed the welder taking the welding certification follows the rules and has the skills will pass the test.

The inspection of welds can be conducted for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most fundamental reason is to determine whether the weld is of suitable quality for its intended application. In order to evaluate a weld's quality, we must first have some form of measuring block with which to compare its characteristics. It is impractical to attempt to evaluate a weld's quality without some form of specified acceptance criteria.

Welding certifications come in many positions, metal thickness, welding processes, and metal types. When the term “Certified Welder” is used it only means that welder is certified under the welding procedures they have tested under. There is not a single welding certification that covers all types of welding.

Do I Want to Be a Welding Inspector?
Welding inspectors examine the connections and bonds between metals. Inspectors use visual tools and electrical instruments to check and ensure the quality and safety of connections.

In addition to working in the field completing their examinations of welding projects, inspectors spend time in an office setting compiling their reports. The majority of inspectors work on a full-time basis, primarily during business workdays. Some risk may be associated with this profession; welding inspectors utilize protective gear during their evaluations to keep themselves from harm on welding sites.

Job Requirements
These professionals begin as welders, which can be gained through experience or postsecondary training, and can become certified inspectors through the American Welding Society (AWS) after meeting education and experience requirements. The table below summarizes common requirements for welding inspectors.